The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

Discussion in 'Movies & TV' started by Alex1939, Mar 31, 2009.

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  1. Alex1939

    Alex1939 Old Man Tip Jar Donor

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    An adaptation of an autobiography of Jean-Dominique Bauby, a former editor of Elle magazine, who suffered a major stroke resulting in locked-in syndrome. He lived around 2 years after the stroke, and in that time dictated the book through blinking.

    Have to get a little personal, it took me awhile to work up the nerve to watch this movie. 7 years ago my father suffered a massive stroke, and was left in locked-in syndrome for around 3 weeks, before finally passing. So far, it's been the toughest thing I've been through in life, to see someone I loved so much, and someone that was so active and full of life, reduced to a "locked-in" state.

    To clarify, "locked-in syndrome" is full paralysis. Yet the person remains aware and cognitively alive. The person can usually communicate through blinks, usually just once for yes, twice for no, kind of stuff.


    About the movie, it's not for everyone. It's very sad, and yet inspiring at the same time. I think it will best serve as a reminder in life, how we too often let little things that do not matter effect us. And how we should always remain grateful of our health and abilities.

    I was surprised the story didn't upset me more. Partially I believe this is because Jean Bauby was in the prime of his life. His children weren't grown. His relationship with some of his family was strained. And that makes the time he was in locked-in syndrome more difficult than that of my fathers. After all, my father already got to spend time with most of his grandchildren, his last grandchild (so far) was born the day he died. He was older, although not exactly old age. And he lived a full and happy life. And he didn't have to suffer nearly as long in the condition.


    I'd recommend the movie, as a remarkable story, and an emotional experience. Still, I think parts of it do drag a little, particularly a few flashbacks that are mainly music. I also watched it with the original french dialogue and text. I normally do that with foreign films, as the english dubbed version always seems to take something away for me personally.


    One more thing I'd like to add, I am a PSL owner and they are in my name, but it was my father who originally purchased them and put them in my name. It was a nice gift and legacy to leave me. I often think of him at games, and I always stay after the last home game of the season, till the seats clear out, and the stadium is near empty. I enjoy reflecting on the season, and also the times my father enjoyed being at the stadium. He was so proud of Nashville to get a professional franchise and to see the stadium built. And although I wasn't there, away in college at the time, I'm so grateful he was in attendance til the end for the music city miracle, one of the most memorable games in the history of all of sports.


    If you can tolerate a movie like this, I hope you'll give it a shot. It's a good story, and will make you reflect on life.
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  2. onetontitan

    onetontitan Fire, walk with me.

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    amen, man. That movie was UNBELIEVABLE. It makes you feel so fortunate, so lucky, to be able to breathe in the air and to walk among your fellow beings. Oh, man. Good movie, my friend. Kudos on the good taste. My mother had a stroke a few months ago, so I know exactly how you feel, man. When the time is right, I want to show my mother this movie. It will surely give her hope in her struggle to cope with her new life.


    most innovative directing i've seen since Kubrick. Some say that it revamped cinema, I agree.
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