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Titans studying Bears from different, lower, angle

Discussion in 'Tennessee Titans and NFL Talk' started by NewsGrabber, Nov 5, 2008.

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    Posted by ESPN.com's Paul Kuharsky NASHVILLE, Tenn. - When Keith Bulluck and Albert Haynesworth sit down to watch film of the Chicago Bears, they get annoyed.

    No, it's not about running back Matt Forte' breaking tackles or Rashied David pulling in a third-down reception.

    It's the low sideline angle of game film from Soldier Field.

    "It sucks, we always notice that when we play them guys," Haynesworth said. "It's horrible I don't know why they do that. You can always tell when you are watching Chicago film from that sideline angle. It sucks. They're definitely the only one. It's just odd once you've seen normal sideline angles and then you see theirs. It's completely different than anybody else's."

    "They have the worst sideline view in the history of the NFL," said Bulluck, probably going a little too far back with his timeframe. "It's kind of tough., Normally you have an above view so you can see the formations, you can kind of see the splits of the linemen, you can see a lot of different things. With the tape when you play the Bears and get it from them -- it's not like they do it on purpose, everybody gets the same tape -- but it's definitely hard to differentiate linemen splits, splits of the wide receivers, things that are really key to studying an offense."

    The Bears said it's a matter of the location of the camera bay in new Soldier Field, which opened in 2003.

    Coaches and players have access to shots of each play of every game from two standard angles - the central sideline and the end zone. A member of each team's video department shoots the game from each spot.

    Titans left tackle Michael Roos said the Bears' low sideline angle is not much of an issue for offensive linemen as they rely more on the end zone look.

    But receiver Brandon Jones said it adds a different wrinkle to preparations.

    "It looks like a high school game almost," he said. "It's weird. Nobody else does it like them that I have seen... But you're going to get the information because you're going to study, study, study. You're going to see how their defensive backs play, how their defense plays, what they play. Your coaches are going to help you out too. We'll be able to figure it out."



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